Sunday, March 16, 2008

A Companion Planting Vegetable Garden Layout

Yesterday I put together a small vegetable layout plan for my raised bed garden. It's just one of many possibilities for companion planting and it only deals with a small number of plants. This plan features tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, and marigolds in a 4 foot by 8 foot bed. All of these plants are listed in various companion planting guides as being compatible with each other. The cucumber will serve as a green mulch, which reduces water loss and helps to protect the soil. The onions will do well in the smaller spaces and the marigolds will help to repel unwanted insects and pests. I may substitute squash in place of the cucumbers. You could also replace the tomatoes with peppers.

A Few Good Tomato Companion Plants:

Asparagus, Onions, Basil, Marigold, Nasturtium, Beans, Celery, Carrots, Cucumber, Peas, and Parsley.



9 comments :

  1. good post on companion planting.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You are educating me about companion planting. Are marigolds edible? A little arugula and other lettuces and there is a fabulous salad in your backyard.

    gail

    ReplyDelete
  3. Looks good to me. I saw another version that is 10 x 10 with an X for walk ways. That way you have 4 different pie shaped beds easy to get to. Sure wish I knew more about companion planting. I knew some plants help others. Then there's rotation planting. Makes my head spin.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Pierce holes in a large plastic cola bottle. Bury the bottle in the middle of your veg patch and top up the water in the bottle when needed. The plants get the water into the roots. Very successful.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I put up 3 4x8 boxes today.

    What do you use to stake your tomatoes? I was planning on putting my tomatoes is separate self watering boxes.

    I'll be back for more tips.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Robin,

    Last year I jury rigged a structure out of tomato stakes and bamboo. It held up but wasn't the best solution. Probably the best way to stake up tomatoes is to use concrete reinforcing wire or fence panels with 4" openings so that you can easily pick the fruits. Traditional tomato cages just don't cut it for indeterminant varieties!

    ReplyDelete
  7. A good use for stakes are old tension curtain rods and ripped up pantyhose. LOL the tension rods can 'grow' with the plants and re-using pantyhose works well for holding them to the 'stakes'. pantyhose are also great for holding melons such as cantaloupes up off the ground- they stretch to allow the melons to grow but keep them off the ground. also, human hair clippings around the edge of your garden will help to keep critters out- rabbits, etc.

    Hope this helps someone! :)
    Happy gardening!
    Aislynn

    ReplyDelete
  8. Im about to plant my first veggie garden ever! I was interested in companion planting. I was wondering how close together the plants can be,i.e. planting carrots and onions to tomatos. My other concern is that I have to wait about a month longer to plant the tomatos due to frost. Will this be distrubing the crop I already have going. Any tips will help. Thanks,
    Mike

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Mike,

    Good questions! In general the guidelines on the seed packages work well. I try to give my tomatoes about 2 square feet each to start with. They will need pruning as you go to keep them tame. If you take a pot and turn it upside down in the bed where you want to plant the tomatoes then plant the other plants around it you should give yourself enough room to plant the tomato plant without disturbing its neighbors!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for reading The Home Garden. Please feel free to comment on the posts, ask questions, offer suggestions, or just say hi!

I read every comment The Home Garden receives and appreciate the time you take to read about what I'm working on!

Dave

Advertising will be removed from comments as the administrator of this blog sees fit. If you wish to advertise please fill out a this contact form with your proposal.