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Sunday, November 15, 2009

November Blooming (The Unusuals)

Our unusually spring like fall weather has encouraged quite a few plants to either continue blooming longer than usual or bloom at a very unusual time!  I went out this morning and took a few pictures of what's blooming in our Tennessee garden as a result of those 70 degree days we've had.

Three different varieties of Achillea millifolium are in our garden with two of them currently blooming. All three may in fact be blooming, I just forgot to check the third!

'Paprika' Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)






 


'Appleblossom' Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

 


I found several salvias still producing flowers. This first one is 'Caradonna' Salvia nemorosa. I'm a big fan of the dark purple colors of the Salvia nemorosas and also have 'East Friesland' and 'May Night' in the garden. I love to propagate salvia in the spring!

 

The 'Mystic Spires' salvia is beginning to fade but the color of the flowers is still hanging on. I bought one of these last year but it didn't survive the winter. Maybe things will be different this year.

 

This Texas sage (Salvia coccinea) that I added to the garden this year is still doing well after several frosts. Hopefully it had enough time to reseed just in case it doesn't come back next year.

 

One of my favorite Gaillardias, 'Oranges and Lemons' is still prolifically blooming. I have two of these planted and both still have quite a few flowers growing. Last year the one I had passed away over the winter (bad location - not enough sun, too wet) but seeded a different gaillardia to replace it. It's probably a reversion back to the parent plant.

 

It's a strange and straggly version of the Susan (Rudbeckia) that was blooming but it's a bloom nonetheless.

 

The 'Purple Homestead' Verbena is still growing strong! I love this plant!

 

While this isn't a bloom I thought it was worth sharing. It's one of the most unusual looking leaves on a red maple (Acer rubrum) I've seen. It didn't appear like this last year, but then it was suffering from repeated deer munchings.

 


I hope you enjoyed what's blooming here in my garden. Hop over to visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens for more Bloomsday Blooms! I wonder what, if anything, will be blooming in December?

9 comments :

  1. This is definitely a weird year for plants blooming later than normal.

    I have seen quite a few but recently wrote about one in particular; a yellow daylilly.

    It was blooming in October when I wrote the post and I just saw it again just a few days ago and it still had a few flowers that were just getting ready to bloom.

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  2. Love all your blooms. Gaillardias are such a great performer.

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  3. A nice variety of color and subject material! December will only find indoor plants blooming, here. :-)

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  4. Just beautiful, your photography looks a little different, love the signature on the photos.

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  5. Dwayne,

    We had several of the Stellas blooming in October. None now but they kept going for a long time too.

    Janet,

    Thanks! The gaillardias are great easy care and nearly no maintenance flowers.

    SG,

    I'm not a big indoor plant person. we have them but most of them don't bloom. No orchids here! We'll just have to see what I can scrounge up for outside shots.

    Darla,

    Thanks! You probably noticed the difference in lenses. Usually I just leave the standard 55 mm lens on but today I had the 55-200mm on and used it for the close-ups. I need to get a macro lens but that will have to wait until the greenhouse is done!

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  6. Acer rubrum looks great. Glad you shared it as it most beautiful.

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  7. Beautiful photos Dave! Love that someone still has blooms~

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  8. 70 in November is nice, isn't it? I love the markings on the Japanese Maple leaf - that is stunning.

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  9. Dave, Great display.

    I also had a G. 'Oranges & Lemons' that didn't make it through the winter, and didn't really get well enough established to bloom heavily while it lived. Some of these newer cultivars can be disappointing.

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