Thursday, August 4, 2011

'Tigger' Melon - Light and Sweet


Every year I try something new in the vegetable garden. When I was selecting seeds back in the dormant season I ran across this small melon called 'Tigger'.  Of course as a parent with three children anything with the name 'Tigger' catches my attention. The 'Tigger' melon was described in the Baker Creek catalog as "vibrant yellow with brilliant fire-red, zigzag stripes."  It's appearance is a little less fancy than hyped in the catalog but that could be due to different growing conditions or a variety of other factors. But it is an orange and yellowish (or maybe orange-yellow) striped melon.  According to the description the seed was found in an Armenian Market.  It's always neat to learn a little about the history around the seeds.

I have my 'Tigger' melons growing on one of our cucumber and melon trellises. When the fruit is ripe the melons simply drop from the vine into the raised bed below.  The small melons rapidly grow to form the green striped melon in the picture below.


After a few days the skin begins to change color into a ruddy orange-green color hinting at the final stages of the fruit.


And when it is ripe it falls to the ground ready to be eaten by a hungry family!  I put this melon in the refrigerator right away to begin chilling.


When sliced open it reveals a while flesh with a thin outer skin. The center has lots of seed perfect for saving (or sharing, more on that in a minute!) The melon's flesh has a light and sweet taste perfect for breakfast!  



I will definitely plant this melon in my garden again. It's flavor may not be the strongest but I kind of like the light sweetness of the fruit. It's not overpowering and would delicious to eat just about any time of the day.


Would you like some seeds?  If so comment below!  I'm sure I can have enough seed for 5 participants to win and maybe more, I'll see what I can do.  Comment by the end of the day on Monday August 8th if you want some 'Tigger' Melon seeds.

I wouldn't recommend that this 'Tigger' bounce!

Original Seeds were purchased from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds and have been grown organically in my garden.

14 comments :

  1. Would love some seeds! We do mostly flowers but last year we had to have our big ol' barn taken down so now we have lots of room for food crops. (Right now we just tuck a few into the perennial beds.)

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  2. We would love to try some of these seeds. This year most of our melons came from volunteers.

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  3. Would love some seeds! I like to try my hand at growing new things.
    Will they come with growing instructions?? ;)

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  4. What an unusual melon. Even the color is intriguing. I too like to try different veggies or flowers. Therefore I sure would like some seeds.

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  5. I'm the same way, Dave - always wanting to try something new every year. This melon is GORGEOUS! I've got some seeds from Baker Creek and will try them next year. This year wouldn't have been a good one, due to the dryness and extreme heat.

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  6. We have gotten some wonderful melons from the roadside stands this summer. Keep my name out of the hat for the seeds as they would flop in my garden. I scattered so many seeds the past two years with little results. Our summers are so dry that I have thoughts of giving up gardening at times. Yikes, I just had a little day time nightmare I think. Anyway, I just wanted to drop by for a visit and catch up a bit on your blog. Things looking good....

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  7. Totally jealous of your melons! Put my name in puh-leeze for some seeds. I'm wanting to try to grow melons vertically since I have such a small space.

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  8. Dave,
    These sound tasty to me, never seen them before. So you grow them on a trellis? count me in.

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  9. Ok, this is also known as the Plum Granny. This is the first time I've heard Tigger Melon. We bought these a few times when I was a kid, but we never ate them. We just enjoyed the smell of it. Which is wonderful by the way. I didn't realize you could eat them. I always thought of them as something like a gourd.

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    Replies
    1. This is not a plum granny. A plum granny does not turn orange and yellow and is not eaten. It is for fragrance only.

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  10. Would love some seeds. Thanks! Your blog is amazing. Will definitely be reading a lot.

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  11. Dave, do you actually wait till these melons fall off the vine?

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  12. Dave, would love some seeds. Thanks for the blog and the advice earlier in the season, it definitely helped me out!

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  13. Thanks to everyone who commented! I think because there were so few comments I could manage to send some to everyone who did comment before my posting this comment. Just send me an email to thehomegarden@gmail.com with your name and address and I'll get some seed in the mail as soon as possible. Thanks for commenting!

    Danielle,

    There is a type called Plum Granny that looks very similar to 'Tigger'. The striping is a little different but most likely they are so close to be related. More like sisters than cousins so to speak.

    Lola,
    You don't have to wait but I've found they kind of drop off on their own from the trellis.

    Sylvia and Leilani,

    You're both local so I'll give you seeds when next I see you!

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Dave

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