Monday, September 26, 2011

Surprised By the Red Spider

Red Spider Lily that is!  This Saturday I was mowing and passed by one of the garden beds on my riding mower when this bright red flower jumped out at me.  Did it really jump?  Nope but one day it wasn't there and now here it is. Spider lilies (Lycoris radiata) are also called a variety of names like Naked Ladies (which are actually Lycoris squamagira), hurricane lilies, and surprise lilies. You can see why the last name fits but the other names have their logic too. If you examine the picture you will note that there are no leaves.  Those come later on after blooming but for now this lily does look rather naked!  These lilies also appear during hurricane season which is why the hurricane lily name has become attached to this beautiful flower.

I don't know how this spider lily came to grow in my garden. There is only one so far and more would be welcome to my garden. I suspect the bulb for this flower tagged along with another plant from a past plant swap. Soon my surprise spider lily will fade from view and send up foliage to gather energy to produce next year's bloom (and hopefully more bulbs).


For more great information on Spider Lilies check out this webpage at the University of Mississippi!

4 comments :

  1. Beautiful bloom. Mine have "jumped" up as well. They have appeared in the most unusual places. Love them.

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  2. Hi Dave! The same thing happened to me!!! Just one... kinda short (probably due to the summer drought) but there, just the same!! :-) Beautiful!

    btw: Playing with the kids (very important) vs sifting compost (important). Yep! Playing with the kids wins!! :-)

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  3. They are up in my garden, too. Love them.

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  4. I moved into my current home almost 5 years ago, and these used to come up along the rock border to my driveway. The last two years have been horrible for us; floods followed my months of drought, followed by more flooding. Only one or two would spring up, and I (knowing nothing about gardening, mind you,) assumed they had been killed by the inconsistent weather. A few weeks ago, they began blooming again. I've gotten into gardening this past summer, and I decided to find out what these beautiful flowers are. When I read that they are grown from bulbs, I decided to dig a few up to see if I could transplant them, and share some bulbs with a neighbor. I was SHOCKED to find over 80 bulbs just under the first flower. I have dug up nearly 700 bulbs, so far, and I'm not even halfway through! The last five years, while enjoyed their beauty and then mourned their loss, they have been busy underground, multiplying and spreading out. Hardy little fellas, aren't they?

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