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Wednesday, August 22, 2012

A Mix of Natives for Wildflower Wednesday

Over at Clay and Limestone Gail celebrates the diversity of native plants with Wildflower Wednesday so I thought I would join in this week to share a few of the native plants I've run across over the past week. 

Let's start with a shrub!  This is what I believe to be a gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa).  It has white clusters of flowers that eventually change into these nearly white berries.  As you can see someone has snatched a few berries - must have been the birds!


Rudbeckia is a favorite of many gardeners for some good reasons: low maintenance, it looks great, feeds the birds, makes pollinators happy, and has a rather cheerful general disposition in the garden!  In this picture my rudbeckia is intertwined with a lilac verbena.  Verbena is another great plant for the pollinators.


I spotted this tall white wildflower over the weekend.  I think it may be a type of eupatorium but that's just a guess.  Maybe you can identify it?


The purple coneflowers look great this year! I think I have a few of these in every garden.  I gather the seed heads in the fall and sprinkle them where I want new plants. 




The Tennessee coneflower is flowering nicely too.  It will hybridize very easily with other coneflowers so we have it separated from its cousins.


This 'Arizona Sun' Gaillardia that I shared yesterday is another native plant well worth planting in the garden. 


Stop over and visit Gail for Wildflower Wednesday!

5 comments :

  1. Dave, I see the little verbena with the rudbeckias~it's cute. Will you propagate it? Put me on the list for a few pots if you offer it for sale! Happy WW

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your white wildflower looks like Frostweed - if so, it's a great butterfly nectar plant!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Dave, I think Michael's right~Verbesina virginica

    ReplyDelete
  4. I have 'Arizona Sun,' too, and it's the first gaillardia that has made it through the winter for me. It's planted in any area that gets very little extra water and little attention, so it has to be a tough plant. Coneflowers are my favorite!

    ReplyDelete

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